Copy by Michel Mancini of the tryptich The Haywain of Hieronymus Bosch (Prado Museum) - Centre Panel

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Copy by Michel Mancini of the tryptich The Haywain of Hieronymus Bosch (Prado Museum) - Centre Panel
Copy by Michel Mancini of the Haywain by Hieronymus Bosch - Central Panel
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The central panel represents the Haywain, strictly speaking.

The original measures 135 cm of height and 100 cm of width and the above presented copy measures the half of these measurements.

This panel could be based on a text of the prophet Isaiah, which says that world pleasures and richness are like the grass of fields : they quickly run dry and even more quickly finish.

It is symbolising something ephemeral but attractive.

On the top of the wagon, while a couple of peasants is kissing (lust), looked at by an owl (which symbolises heresy and human blindness) three personages are dedicating to music, and a man is observing the scene. On the right of this man a blue demon with a trumpy nose and a peacock tail (symbol of vanity) is participating to the melody, while, on the left, an angel, in a praying attitude, is looking towards Christ who is in the sky.
The owl and the demon may hang together as coaxing and trickery.

At the head of the cortege which follows the wagon there are the king of France, a duke, the Pope, a bishop and the Emperor.

In front of this group, a woman clothed as a nun is threating a man with a knife and at the centre of the panel we can see an homicide.

Pulling the wagon to drive it into Hell, represented on the right panel, there are creatures, hybrids between men and animals.

Friar Siguënza, at the end of the sixteenth century considered that thes creatures were symbolising the various vices :
" This Haywain which goes to glory, is pulled by seven wild beasts, horrendous monsters, where we can see men painted as half lion, half dog, half bear, half fish, half wolf, all symbols and image of the society who epitomise lust, cupidity, covetousness, bestility, tyranny, wiliness and brutality".

According to another theory, the seven deadly sins would be represented in the lower edge, with on the right, just above Bosch's signature, a group of nuns who seem to be guilty of the sin of cupidity.

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Hay-wain Hay wain Haywain Hieronymus Bosch Hieronymus Bosch triptych central panal seven deadly sins Flemish school Dutch school Flemish Dutch Renaissance gothic style painting paintings copies copy reproduction reproductions Michel Mancini master old masters to order commission commissions oil on canvas oil canvas virtual gallery gallery painter Italian school fantastic painting surrealist painting surrealism sixteenth century Renaissance
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Oil copy on canvas of the triptych the Haywain by Hieronymus van Aaken known as Hieronymus Bosch at the Prado Museum in Madrid Oil copy on canvas of the triptych the Haywain by Hieronymus van Aaken known as Hieronymus Bosch at the Prado Museum in Madrid Oil copy on canvas of the triptych the Haywain by Hieronymus van Aaken known as Hieronymus Bosch at the Prado Museum in Madrid
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